General Business News with Embedded Videos

02/28/2018 jguerrasio@businessinsider.com (Jason Guerrasio)
20th Century Fox "Red Sparrow" director Francis Lawrence reacts to the love-hate response critics have had to the movie. Despite some saying that the movie glorifies rape and violence, he said, "I don't think it's gratuitous in any way."  Jennifer Lawrence's latest movie "Red Sparrow" opens in theaters on Friday, and depending who you believe in the film criticism world, the 20th Century Fox release is either a unique spy thriller rarely made by a Hollywood studio, or a dull pretentious work that glorifies rape and violence.  With a current rating of 60% on Rotten Tomatoes, the love-hate reaction for the movie is one that its director, Francis Lawrence ("Hunger Games: Catching Fire" and "Hunger Games: Mockingjay" 1 and 2), is still trying to wrap his head around.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: You can connect all 9 Best Picture Oscar nominees with actors they have in common — here's howSee Also:Jennifer Lawrence shared her 'biggest fear' about doing a nude scene for her new movie 'Red Sparrow'Jennifer Lawrence says she turned off Oscar-nominated 'Phantom Thread' after 3 minutesJennifer Lawrence says she felt empowered doing nudity in her new movie following her 2014 nude photo hackSEE ALSO: Our predictions of who will win at the 2018 Oscars on Sunday night — and who really should win

02/13/2018 kacuna@businessinsider.com (Kirsten Acuna)
Warner Bros. Cyborg/Victor Stone is one of the founding members of the "Justice League." His character was introduced in Warner Bros.' "Batman v Superman" and will get his own movie in 2020. In an exclusive behind-the-scenes video shared with INSIDER, Cyborg actor Ray Fisher outlines how he trained to become the half man, half bot. "Physically, the training has been rigorous," says Fisher. The 30-year-old actor says says he was training about five days a week for about two hours a day. He estimates gaining about 20 pounds of muscle. "Justice League" is available now on digital HD and will be available on Blu-ray and DVD January 13. Watch the behind-the-scenes video below. Youtube Embed:http://www.youtube.com/embed/_L4WkqUw_bsWidth: 560pxHeight: 315pxNOW WATCH: Watch SpaceX launch a Tesla Roadster to Mars on the Falcon Heavy rocket — and why it mattersSee Also:Here's who we would cast in the upcoming 'Kim Possible' live-action movie'Fifty Shades' star Jamie Dornan demonstrates the right way to sensually take a woman's underwear offThe 'Fifty Shades Freed' star had a thong superglued to her for sex scenes

02/12/2018 lgarfield@businessinsider.com (Leanna Garfield)
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation/YouTube The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has funneled billions in funding toward improving US education and raising public high school graduation rates. In Bill and Melinda's annual letter, Bill writes that schools around the country are still "falling short on important metrics." The foundation's new strategy focuses on listening to teacher feedback, and funding programs that are specific to each community. On Tuesday, Bill and Melinda Gates published their annual letter. In it, the pair answers 10 questions that people often ask them. One question wonders what they "have to show" for the billions the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has spent on US education in the past decade.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: The coolest gadgets we saw at CES 2018See Also:Bill Gates thinks Trump's 'America First' stance is damaging to the worldThe hottest neighborhood in 25 US citiesA major California city could become the first to create its own bitcoin-inspired currency

02/12/2018 feedback@businessinsider.com (Tyler Lauletta)
Skeleton is one of the most intense sports you'll find at the Winter Olympics, with athletes flying at up to 90 miles per hour down an icy track. American skeleton rider John Daly recently gave fans a first-hand look at what it feels like to fly down the mountain like a pro. Daly lost control of his sled in his final run at Sochi 2014, and will be looking for redemption and a medal at Pyeongchang. Skeleton is one of the most exhilarating and death-defying events of the Winter Olympics. Athletes sprint at full speed, leap onto their small sled headfirst, and tuck in to gather as much speed as they can as they fly down the icy track at breakneck speed.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: No one wants to host the Olympics anymore — will they go away?See Also:The 25 best photos of the Winter Olympics so farThe 17-year-old snowboarder who won gold for the US woke up late on the day of the event and had to borrow his roommate's jacketHere's why there are tiny green plants at the bottom of the ski jump hillSEE ALSO: Here are the gold-medal favorites for every single event at the Winter Olympics

02/12/2018 zbernard@businessinsider.com (Zoë Bernard)
Lemonade Insurance provider Lemonade is a three-year-old startup that recently received $120 million in a funding round led by Japanese telecom giant Softbank. Lemonade is attempting to reinvent the homeowners and renters insurance model in the US by cutting out brokers, offering competitive rates, and using an AI-powered mobile app. Co-founder Daniel Schreiber sat down with Business Insider to chat about the key characteristic needed to break into a multi-billion dollar marketplace.   In the spring of 2015, Daniel Schreiber and Shai Wininger sat down in a cramped coworking space with a whiteboard and an unusual goal: to reinvent the homeowner and rental insurance industry, entirely from scratch.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: This personal airbag could help protect the elderly from hip injuriesSee Also:Retailers GOAT and Flight Club merge into online sneaker shopping paradise, snag $60 million in new fundingAirbnb made $93 million in profit on $2.6 billion in revenue, but an internal clash sent the CFO out the doorAdults who went undercover at a high school found 7 things people don't realize about life for teenagers today

02/12/2018 zbernard@businessinsider.com (Zoë Bernard)
Lemonade Insurance provider Lemonade is a three-year-old startup that recently received $120 million in a funding round led by Japanese telecom giant Softbank. Lemonade is attempting to reinvent the homeowners and renters insurance model in the US by cutting out brokers, offering competitive rates, and using an AI-powered mobile app. Co-founder Daniel Schreiber sat down with Business Insider to chat about the key characteristic needed to break into a multi-billion dollar marketplace.   In the spring of 2015, Daniel Schreiber and Shai Wininger sat down in a cramped coworking space with a whiteboard and an unusual goal: to reinvent the homeowner and rental insurance industry, entirely from scratch.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: This personal airbag could help protect the elderly from hip injuriesSee Also:Adults who went undercover at a high school found 7 things people don't realize about life for teenagers todayRetailers GOAT and Flight Club merge into online sneaker shopping paradise, snag $60 million in new fundingAirbnb made $93 million in profit on $2.6 billion in revenue, but an internal clash sent the CFO out the door

02/11/2018 feedback@businessinsider.com (Sponsor Post)
IBM Luis Hernandez Bermejo, FIT Fashion Design Major, Stefka De Ruiter, FIT Fashion Design Major, Grace McCarty, FIT Fashion Design Major, and Amy Taehwa Eun, FIT Fashion Design Major  Today’s young shoppers increasingly want personalized goods. According to an IBM study, 52% of Gen Z females would like to see tools that allow them to customize products for themselves.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:One of the best tech upgrades I've made to my car cost me less than $25South Korea spent over $1 billion on these mega-venues for the 2018 Winter Olympics — take a lookAn abandoned baseball stadium site is being turned into the largest wooden office tower in the US

02/11/2018 lrocketto@businessinsider.com (Leah Rocketto)
Matthew Stockman / Dimitrios Kambouris / Getty US figure skater Adam Rippon has been a fan-favorite at the Winter Olympics.  Although Rippon's Olympic performance was set to something similar to club music, he had a different song in mind at one point.  Prior to the Olympics, Rippon recorded his own cover of "Diamonds" by Rihanna.  He even performed the song at the NHK Trophy, the "grand prix" of figure skating. Watch Rippon perform the song below.    The Winter Olympics have only just begun, but Adam Rippon has already earned the gold medal in personality. The 28-year-old figure skater has been winning viewers over with his humor, honesty, and relatability. Case in point: his love for Rihanna. See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Here's what might happen if North Korea launched a nuclear weaponSee Also:Sexual assault looms large over the 2018 Olympics — and it shows we have a long way to go to keep athletes safe14 of the most memorable outfits from the Winter Olympics opening ceremony1,200 security workers at the Olympics are being tested for a nasty virus

02/11/2018 lbeaver@businessinsider.com (Laurie Beaver)
BII The smartphone is an essential part of our everyday lives. But as with all technology, things change. So the question becomes: What will be the next smartphone?See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:Facebook Watch may become more like YouTubePublishers turn away from Facebook Instant ArticlesSnapchat signals e-commerce ambitions

02/11/2018 jguerrasio@businessinsider.com (Jason Guerrasio)
Sundance Institute The Netflix documentary "Seeing Allred" gives viewers a look inside the life and career of attorney Gloria Allred. Filmmakers Roberta Grossman, Sophie Sartain, and executive producer Marta Kauffman told Business Insider how they worked in the #MeToo movement just before they had to hand the movie in. Women’s rights attorney Gloria Allred has spent a good chunk of her four-decade career getting in front of the camera. Her fight for women’s equality has often seen her in the spotlight, holding press conferences with her female clients who, over the years, have alleged sexual assault by some of the biggest names in entertainment, politics, sports, and business. But when filmmakers Roberta Grossman and Sophie Sartain approached Allred about making a documentary about her life and career, the media-savvy attorney wasn’t very interested.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: A Georgetown professor explains how Martin Luther King Jr. 'has been severely whitewashed'See Also:A new Netflix documentary shows a side of Gloria Allred the public has never seen — and it took the filmmakers years for her to agree to do itThe 18 worst Netflix original movies of all time, according to criticsDisney thinks it has a big advantage in its coming war with Netflix — but Wall Street is split on whether it has the right battle strategySEE ALSO: "The Tale" is an explosive look at its director's experience with sexual abuse that has Sundance audiences buzzing